Do you need to rehome your dog?

Nov 30, 2016

People need to rehome their dog(s) for many reasons – a change in family circumstances, change in accommodation, moving interstate/overseas or simply because they can’t afford to keep them anymore.

Deciding that you need to rehome your dog is a difficult decision and ARF understands that it can be an emotional time. While ARF will help out the best that we can with dogs in the Canberra or nearby NSW region, it is important to remember that our objects state that our focus is on dogs at imminent risk of euthanasia – this usually means dogs in the pounds. ARF foster carers have limited space and it is rare that a carer will be able to take your dog into their own home for rehoming.

There are a number of things you should do prior to contacting ARF:

  • If you got your dog from a breeder, try contacting the breeder to see if they will take the dog back and rehome him or her.
  • Contact a breed specific rescue group. There are a number of rescue groups that concentrate on specific breeds and often have waiting lists of people wanting that type of dog.
  • Desex your dog. Your dog can then not be used for backyard breeding and is more likely to be chosen by a responsible pet owner.
  • Make a start on trying to re-home the dog yourself. Advertise him or her in the paper, on noticeboards, websites such as Trading Post, Gumtree and forums; it is best not to advertise your dog as free to good home. Ask a small fee to discourage uncommitted and unscrupulous people from responding to your advertisement. You can always donate the money to your favourite charity if you feel uncomfortable about accepting money.
  • Team Dog have some great advice for people needing to rehome their dogs here and here.

ARF can help in the following ways:

  • ARF has an extensive and very successful poster network. This network has rehomed hundreds, if not thousands of dogs. Send us a photo of your dog, details including the dog’s name, age, breed, size, whether he or she is desexed, microchipped and vaccinated, as well as if he or she is good with kids, needs a friend and exercise requirements, along with your contact details and we can have a poster distributed very quickly.
  • If you are able to keep the dog in your home, then an ARF carer may be able to assist you with rehoming him or her. You will need to sign papers to surrender the dog to ARF and the carer will come and meet you and your dog to assess their requirements for a new home. The dog will be advertised on the ARF website and the foster carer will accept enquiries and decide on the right home for the dog.

You can take your dog to the pound and surrender him or her. Both Domestic Animal Services (DAS) and Queanbeyan Palerang Regional Council Animal Management Facility  have low euthanasia rates and excellent relationships with rescue groups. ARF assesses the dogs at DAS and Queanbeyan each week and we do everything we can to find them a place in a rescue group, either locally or interstate. ARF has assisted in the rescue and direct adoption of thousands of dogs from these pounds.

However, the pound is a scary place for most dogs and this can cause your dog to display behaviours which are not conducive to them being adopted. There are also times that we do not have the resources to rescue your dog and if the pound is full, your dog may be euthanased after seven days. All options should be considered before surrendering your dog to the pound.

Finally, be realistic. If you have explored every avenue and have had no success then it might be kinder to take your dog to the vet and have him or her put to sleep while you hold them. Please never abandon your pet,  this is one of the cruellest fates any domestic pet could meet. The danger, fear,and suffering they will encounter are heartbreaking even if they manage to survive at all.

Please contact rehome@fosterdogs.org if you need help with rehoming your dog.

Also see:  Useful links – pounds & other rescue groups